Sun Dried Stinging Nettle (For Tea)

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Sun Dried Stinging Nettle (For Tea)

Postby PoC » Fri May 03, 2013 12:16 pm

I've got nettles growing in the garden and wanted to dry some for tea. I cut just the fresh and tender tops off before they started flowering, skewered them with a needle and some dental floss, and hung them out to dry between some grape vines that haven't leafed out yet.

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Once they dried I put them all into a mason jar and smashed them up a bit. The stinging parts are still not disarmed but brittle and fuzz-like at this stage. It's ok though since it will be used for tea and the heat will disarm them.

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I don't personally find nettle tea on its own to be very pleasant. The taste isn't offensive but It has a bit of a bland grassy taste so I will be using it to mix with other tea and herbs as a tonic. I may cut and dry some more to be sure I will have enough to use until next year's harvest.

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Re: Sun Dried Stinging Nettle (For Tea)

Postby uzadael » Fri May 24, 2013 12:56 pm

very cool idea, :shock: maybe some nettle kombucha!?


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Re: Sun Dried Stinging Nettle (For Tea)

Postby Auxin » Sun Jun 09, 2013 12:28 pm

Bland and grassys can be a great foundation for tea mixes to give them body.
I use dried lemon balm to make my thyme, oregano, lavender flower, etc. teas a real tea strength.
Nettle should work good too :thumbup:


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Re: Sun Dried Stinging Nettle (For Tea)

Postby uzadael » Sun Jun 09, 2013 2:44 pm

Cool now I need to grow some....!thank you!
:D


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Re: Sun Dried Stinging Nettle (For Tea)

Postby PoC » Sun Jun 09, 2013 4:50 pm

Auxin wrote:Bland and grassys can be a great foundation for tea mixes to give them body.
I use dried lemon balm to make my thyme, oregano, lavender flower, etc. teas a real tea strength.
Nettle should work good too :thumbup:


So true. I am big on mixing herbs and spices into teas. A common go-to tea I've been making for myself is something like: Black tea, yarrow, reishi, cinnamon, and honey (with frequent substitutions and experiments). Yarrow doesn't have a grassy taste, more a minor medicine-like taste, but personally I think it really rounds out the taste of my tea when used in the correct amount.

Uzadael - nettles are so easy to grow! :D The first year they will probably not get very big but during the winter while other plants are dormant the roots of the nettles take every opportunity to grow. By the spring of the second year they spread into a fierce patch either 3 or 4ft. square. They're such useful plants - very nutritious food from the young leaves, fiber for cordage from the stems, the seeds are an adrenal gland stimulant, the plant can be anaerobically fermented to produce liquid fertilizer, the stings and tea from the plant are used against rheumatism, the tea can be used as a hair conditioner...the uses go on and on. That's not to even mention every year I see a lot of soldier beetles and ladybugs using my nettle patches as habitat. If I had the space I would start a much larger patch of nettles but at least there are wild ones around here to play with too.

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Re: Sun Dried Stinging Nettle (For Tea)

Postby MeanGreenBean » Wed May 24, 2017 10:16 am

I realize this is an old thread but I figured I'd say I definitely prefer nettle tea fresh. It also works better as a stock than a tea. Maybe use it for a risotto? :mrgreen:


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